Artifacts

Do you have photos of artifacts from the USS Cumberland Sound? If so, we’d love to be able to add them to this collection. Please use the Contact link.


Artifacts from Lt. Commander Norman Harris. He can be seen in this photo holding the pipe in center on the back row. Information and photos provided by his sons, Malcom and Stuart Harris.

Medals awarded to Lt. Commander Norman Harris. (Photo credit: Estate of Norman C. Harris)

U.S. Navy fighting knife. Issued to Lt. Commander Norman Harris. For more information on this knife, see MilitaryItems.com.(Photo credit: Estate of Norman C. Harris)

Reverse side of knife issued to Lt. Commander Norman Harris. (Photo credit: Estate of Norman C. Harris)

Protective goggle case issued during atomic bomb test. (Photo credit: Estate of Hubert T. Duncan)

Inside view of protective goggles issued during atomic bomb test. (Photo credit: Estate of Hubert T. Duncan)

Outside view of protective goggles issued for atomic bomb test. (Photo credit: Estate of Hubert T. Duncan)

Commemorative envelope from the U.S.S. Cumberland Sound – atomic bomb test at Bikini Atoll. (Photo credit: Estate of Hubert T. Duncan)

Certificate commemorating the witnessing of the surrender of Japan, issued to Lt. Norman Harris, USNR. Provided by the Estate of Norman C. Harris

Certificate commemorating the witnessing of the surrender of Japan, issued to Lt. Norman Harris, USNR. Provided by the Estate of Norman C. Harris

A softball used in on-deck games aboard the Cumberland Sound, still in usable shape. From the memorabilia of Norman Harris; photo provided by his son Stuart.

A softball used in on-deck games aboard the Cumberland Sound, still in usable shape. From the memorabilia of Norman Harris; photo provided by his son Stuart.

Christmas card from the Norfolk training base where many seaplane tender officers were trained, including Norman Harris. Photo provided by Stuart Harris.

Christmas card from the Norfolk training base where many seaplane tender officers were
trained, including Norman Harris. Photo provided by Stuart Harris.


© Stephen Clay McGehee 2011 – 2017
Unless otherwise noted, this work is copyrighted by Stephen Clay McGehee.
Material identified as being contributed by others is copyrighted
by the persons contributing that material.

Welcome to the U.S.S. Cumberland Sound

7 Responses to Artifacts

  1. Flor says:

    God Bless all who have served. CC Richardson My Grandpa WW2 5 battle stars 3 bronze 2 silver 2 purple hearts. My Father Cook Arkansas National Guard 1962-1970. IP Lynch 3rd SC Vol Company D Cross Anchors 1863-1865 1st Battle the Wilderness at age 14 mustered out a few weeks before Lee’s Surrender. Died in March 1933.

  2. Dorothy Carmichael says:

    My husband, Willard B. Carmichael, served on this ship. He was in charge of the gyro-compass and was emc2. He died April 24, 2002. I think he went on board this ship at Pearl Harbor. If anyone knows I would love to hear from you. He also showed movies up on deck. He left the states from Treasure Island.
    Thank you, Dorothy Carmichael

  3. Stephen Clay McGehee says:

    Thank you for stopping by and commenting, Mrs. Carmichael. I deeply appreciate your late husband’s service. Each time I hear from the family of one of my late father’s shipmates, it’s like another connection to his memory. I sure hope that you hear from someone who has more information about him.

  4. Stu Harris says:

    Stephen,

    That link to military items about the USN Camillis knife is very informative. I’m very happy that my Dad’s knife is still in use by me cleaning trout each year. My wife’s Japanese mother grew up in Imperial Japan, and we’ve used it for making sushi and tuna poki. Swords into plowshares! My Dad would be happy.

  5. Stephen Clay McGehee says:

    Knives were meant to be used, and there is a lot of symbolism in that one, Stu. My Dad’s knife sat neglected for too many years to be in regular use now. It has been cleaned up and is no longer deteriorating, but it now sits in a drawer rather than being used.

  6. Stu Harris says:

    Stephen,

    My wife’s grandfather was a captain in the Japanese Imperial Navy. I’m sure he had an impressive sword.

    Nations can heal, and families join. We live in a world that is meant to be good.

  7. Stephen Clay McGehee says:

    Meant to be good, but so seldom is. Thanks for the reminder that sometimes things do turn out that way.

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